Press Releases

press area

WHO publishes ICD 11 beta

TGEU Statement, August 22, 2014

A step in the right direction: WHO proposes to remove F64 ”gender identity disorders” from the mental and behavioural disorders

TGEU welcomes that in the ICD 11 beta draft section 7: Mental and behavioural disorders (used to be section F in the ICD 10) the category ”gender identity disorders” has been removed. As well other stigmatizing categories from the former F65 category such as Fetishism, Fetishistic transvestitism or sadomasochism do not show any more.

The WHO proposes a ”gender incongruence” category under the new section 6: ”Conditions related to sexual health”. The new category includes both Gender inconguence of adolscene and adulthood (6A50) and Gender incongruence of childhood (6A51). Not labelling trans people as mentally ill anymore will be an important step forward and will help to reduce stigma.

To include ”Gender incongruence of adolescence and adulthood” in the sexual health category is something that trans human rights NGOs such as Global Action for Trans* Equality (GATE), Stop Trans Pathologization (STP) and Transgender Europe (TGEU) have been demanding. However, the definition needs to be clearly focusing on trans people with a need for medical treatment.

Unfortunately the WHO experts did not follow the recommendation of trans activists to drop the diagnosis of gender incongruence in childhood completely from the ICD 11.

In the next years it will be our task to lobby the WHO to remove the childhood diagnosis completely from the ICD 11 as it is an unnecessary category. Children need the freedom to be who they are. But before puberty there is no need for medical treatment and therefore no need for inclusion in the ICD. At the same time we will have to closely follow and analyse the details of the Gender incongruence chapter.” says Julia Ehrt, Executive Director of TGEU.

The proposed shift of the categories relevant for trans persons could be the first step towards an alternative approach towards trans identities within the medical and psychological establishment. The careful reader will notice that the wording of the category is non-binary and potentially open for more than just male and female genders. However we will have to see whether the category stays like this until the final vote of the WHO general assembly anticipated for 2017 and if it does how it will eventually be applied in everyday practice.

ENDS

Transgender Europe is a European human rights NGO working for the human rights and equality of all trans people. More Information: www.tgeu.org

GATE – Global action for Trans*Equality is a global human rights initiative advocating for the human rights of transgender persons. More information: www.transactivists.org

STP – Stop Trans Pathologization is an initiative that works towords the depathologization of trans identities. More information: www.stp2012.info

TGEU Executive Director Dr. Julia Ehrt is available for interviews and questions and can be reached at:

email: Julia [replace this bracket with the at sign] tgeu.org

phone: +49 (0)30 5360 2664

AttachmentSize
2014-08-21__TGEU_ICD11-beta_final.pdf44.06 KB

TGEU Media Release "Rejection and Unawareness: Eurobarometer's first findings on attitudes towards trans people"

Eurobarometer_reveals_trans_rejection TGEU Media Release
 
Rejection and Unawareness:  Eurobarometer's first findings on attitudes towards trans people
Transgender Europe - TGEU
Media Release
 
Rejection and Unawareness:  Eurobarometer's first findings on attitudes towards trans people
22nd November 2012, Nicosia, Cyprus
 
Europeans are unaware of trans people and reject them at great levels reveals the today published Eurobarometer. EU Commission vows to step up future actions for trans people and commemorates Transgender Day of Remembrance at the Equality Summit in Nicosia, Cyprus. Designated EU Health Commissioner pledges to fight for transgender people not being considered mentally ill.
 
The Eurobarometer revealed that only 8% of people in EU know a trans person personally and a striking 13% have no opinion on  the prevalence of trans discrimination (compared with 8% for sexual orientation).  In some countries up to a third would not know. 45%  of people in the EU believe trans people are discriminated. The report points out that those knowing a trans person are much more likely to be aware of discrimination on grounds of gender identity.
 
While the report shows diversity in  the public sphere is more accepted, people would be very uncomfortable with a trans person in the highest political office. Only  a person over 75 years of age (5,4) would meet more antipathy than a transgender or transsexual elected official (5,7) on a scale from 1 to 10 (with 1 “totally uncomfortable” and 10 “totally comfortable”) on EU average.
 
The Discrimination Eurobarometer monitors the perception, attitudes, knowledge and awareness of discrimination and is published by the European Commission. This year's publication includes for the first time the ground of gender identity allowing for an unique comparative overview on awareness towards transgender and transsexual persons in the 27 EU member states. The European Commission vowed that its future policy and activities would be guided by those findings. 
 
Aurel Ciobanu Dordea, Director in the European Commission, also commemorated those who lost their lives due to transphobia or transphobic violence at the occasion of the Transgender Day of Remembrance on November 20th when presenting the research at the opening session of the Equality Summit 2012.
 
„We see striking similarities in structural barriers faced by trans people and persons with disabilities. However, unfortunately in comparison, the EU has no strategic approach on trans people yet. The EU has a role to play in this!“ said TGEU Executive Director Julia Ehrt at the EU Equality Summit today.
 
Concrete steps have also been promised by the nominated EU Health commissioner Tonio Borg. He pledged to fight transgender people being considered as mentally ill, specifically referring to a resolution of the European Parliament of September 2011 calling for an international non-pathologising reclassification of transgender identities.
„We welcome this research and commitment shown by the European Commission. The great level of unawareness call for an strategic approach by the EU towards trans equality. Political leadership on European level is necessary to win over hearts and minds.“ comments TGEU Policy Officer Richard Köhler.
 
###
 
The Special Eurobarometer “Discrimination in the EU 2012” can be downloaded here: http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/eb_special_399_380_en.htm
 
Transgender Europe – TGEU is a European not-for-profit, umbrella organization, working towards the full equality and inclusion of all trans people in Europe.For more information contact TGEU Policy Officer Richard Köhler at Richard(at)tgeu.org.
 
 

 

DSM – REVISION: NO END TO TRANS* PATHOLOGIZATION

17/02/2010

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) released on Feb 10th 2010 a draft version of the Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V (DSM) .[1]

TGEU [2] observes with great concern that trans identities are still pathologized and considered a mental health condition.

Given its strong implications on the living of trans people in Europe and other parts of the world, it should take into account the conclusions of the Human Rights Commissioner of the Council of Europe: “From a human rights and health care perspective no mental disorder needs to be diagnosed in order to give access to treatment for a condition in need of medical care.” “Alternative classifications should be explored in close consultation with transgender persons and their organisations.” [3]

The APA needs to safeguard the human rights of trans people in the current revision of the DSM IV.

No national or international health institution or association of health professionals shall be able to render transgender identities as mental health disorders.

TGEU once again appeals to the APA to consult with transgender organizations and to increase the transparency of the revision process of the DSM V.

 

END

Contact: office@tgeu.org

Diagnosing diversity is crazy - Trans people are sane

TGEU_Logo

TGEU Media Release:

Diagnosing diversity is crazy - Trans people are sane

TGEU Media Release

20th October 2012 

On the occasion of the International Action Day on Trans Depathologization Transgender Europe calls on the European states to recognize that all persons have the right to their gender identity.
 
Transgender Identities are still regarded as mental disorders in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) of the World Health Organization. TGEU calls for a depathologization of trans identities and demands a change into a non-pathological category to guaranty full access to trans-related health care and recognition of identities.
 
“Instead of insisting in an often unnecessary and unwanted diagnosis, health care professionals need to work towards supporting trans people and their human rights. Attempting to diagnose diversity is pointless - trans people are not disordered. Healthcare providers must support trans people’s health.“  says Maria Sundin, TGEU co-chair.
 
To require a mental health diagnosis hinders many trans people from enjoying the most basic rights, as it limits access to care providers and to insurance covered and public funded health services. Moreover many European countries require a diagnosis for a change of gender marker. As a result many trans people find themselves in limbo and are barred from enjoying most basic human rights.
 
Transgender Europe emphasizes that every person has a right to self-determination.
 
“Many trans people require documents and medical treatments to live a life in dignity. However, they are forced to undergo degrading and often unwanted diagnostic and medical processes. Laws that are based on the idea that trans people are actually disordered reinforce stereotypes and social exclusion.” explains TGEU Policy Officer Richard Köhler.
 
The European parliament in 2011 called for trans de-pathologization and Finland, Norway and Sweden removed some of gender identities from their national versions of the ICD-10.
 
Policy makers at the WHO, EU, Council of Europe and on national levels need to speak out against stigmatization and in support of trans diversity.
 
On October 20th manifestations and actions are held worldwide to protest against Transgender identities being considered as mental disorders. In October 2011, actvist groups of 70 cities in Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania organized demonstrations and other actions.
 
ENDS
 
 
For further information contact TGEU Policy Officer Richard Köhler at richard [at] tgeu.org
 

EU-Parliament endorses trans people human rights

 EU-Parliament endorses trans people human rights  

 Press release For Immediate Release

June 17 2010, Brussels   Yesterday, the Parliament officially acknowledged discrimination on grounds of gender identity, calls for accessible gender reassignment procedures, and insists future EU gender equality initiatives should address issues linked to gender identity and gender reassignment.

Transgender Europe welcomes the strong endorsement by the European Parliament in favor of safeguarding transgender people’s fundamental rights.

The Figueiredo-report evaluating the European Union’s 2006-2010 Roadmap for equality between women and men was adopted today, and calls for more explicit measures to combat discrimination based on gender identity. In particular, the report:

acknowledges discrimination and multiple discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and/or gender identity; calls on EU authorities to include lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) organisations in future work on gender equality; stresses that gender reassignment procedures should be made accessible, including through public health insurance schemes; and requires that future EU actions in the field of gender equality explicitly cover issues linked to gender identity and gender reassignment.

TGEU salutes this ground-breaking acknowledgment as an important step forward in achieving equality for transgender people. We call upon the European Commission to follow these recommandations in the Roadmap for Gender Equality. This will strengthen human rights of transgender people in the European Union. TGEU hopes that it will eventually lead to an easy and accessible procedures for the legal gender recognition in the member states. Still many EU member states require sterilization and compulsory sex reassignment surgery for legal gender recognition. This contradicts Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, guaranteeing each person’s right to a private and family life.    

“These unjustified violations of the human rights of transgender people have to be ended now. Member States need to ensure accessible, transparent and quick administrative procedures to change name and gender” says Dr. Julia Ehrt, TGEU-vice chair “This would send a strong signal that transgender people are no second-class citizens because of their gender identity. A first step in that direction has been taken today.”  

Richard Köhler, TGEU-Steering committee member says: "The EU has the potential and willingness to become the world's pioneer in safeguarding transgender people's fundamental rights. We call upon the up-coming Belgian EU-Presidency to ensure internal and external coherence of the EU, when promoting Human Rights worldwide."   END   TransGender Europe – TGEU is a European third sector, umbrella organization, which works towards the full equality and inclusion of all trans people in Europe. Find out more information on www.tgeu.org Contact: Secretary@tgeu.org  

European Parliament asks WHO to depathologize transgender identities

TGEU logo

European Parliament asks WHO to depathologize transgender identities TGEU Press Release | 28th July 2011

Europe and especially the European Union like to proud themselves as pioneers in human rights. Today, the European parliament acknowledges that within the EU human rights of transgender, gay, lesbian and bisexual persons are still violated. Moreover the Parliament calls upon the EU commission and the WHO to depathologize trans identities. Taking into account the historic UN resolution “Human Rights, sexual orientation and gender identity” from earlier this year, the parliamentarians address a range of areas of concern to the European Commission and EU member states. 

TGEU very much welcomes the resolution of the European Parliament.

The resolution endorses the adoption of the UNHRC resolution A/HRC/17/19 and lends its support to the work undertaken by the OHCHR so far as well as concrete assistance in organizing a panel at the 19th UN UNHCR session to enable an open dialogue amongst states on related human rights issues.

The European parliament calls on the Commission and the WHO – a UN body – to withdraw gender identity disorders from the list of mental and behavioral disorders while ensuring a non-pathologizing re-coding in the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

Further on, the EP regrets that among others the “right of access to preventive health care and to benefit from medical treatment” is not upheld in all EU countries. This relates especially to the unworthy struggle many trans people have to face when having to undergo mandatory genital surgery and forced sterilization as prescribed in Gender Recognition legislation in 29 countries in Europe1. Accessing transgender related health care and/ or obtaining financial assistance to do so is problematic in a number of EU countries.

Co-Chair Julia Ehrt comments: “Health is a major concern for many trans people in Europe. Acknowledging that all people including trans persons have a right to preventive and assisted health care is key. The Commission has to act now!”

“This resolution is crucial in saying that the EU has a role to play in the global struggle for a depathologization of gender identities towards the well-being of trans people. We expect the European Commission to pro-actively work towards a depathologization of trans identities. The current revision of the ICD is a historic chance and the Commission cannot ignore this but needs to give its input.” adds Richard Köhler, TGEU co-chair.

UN resolution A/HRC/17/19 was the first of its kind addressing only human rights concerns on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. Within a coordinated effort from LGBT groups worldwide, TGEU had contributed in a months-long discussion process behind the scenes to shape the resolution as trans-inclusive as possible.

European Parliament resolution adopted today (Final version, PDF)

The UN Human Rights Council resolution of 17 June 2011

 
ENDS
 
1 „Discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity in Europe“ (2011) by Commissioner for Human Rights Thomas Hammarberg

 

Every 2nd day a murder of a transgender person is reported

TGEU research shows:

Every 2nd day a murder of a transgender person is reported

 

The TGEU research project Transrespect versus Transphobia finds an alarming trend. On Sept 14th TvT published that since 2008 420 transgender people have been reportedly killed. This means every 2nd day a murder of a transgender person is reported. This are more than alarming signs and we demand from national and European poiticians to take up the issue and to act quickly.

 

>>> Go to the Press Release of TMM here <<<

 

MEDIA RELEASE by TGEU: Members of European Parliament call for trans and intersex inclusive Roadmap

TGEU demands mroe action from European Union on Trans Issues

MEP i Romeva, co-author Agius, TGEU Köhler (left to right)

Members of European Parliament call for  trans and intersex inclusive Roadmap

 
MEDIA RELEASE
September 28th 2012
 
Members of European Parliament call for  trans and intersex inclusive Roadmap
 
The LGBT Intergroup and the European Greens held a seminar on “Trans and Intersex People: Challenges for EU Law” on September 26th 2012 at the European Parliament with the presentation of a new Thematic Study on Trans and Intersex Discrimination.
 
The legal study proofs blatant lack of protection and recognition of trans and Intersex people under EU Law. It’s for the first time that intersex issues have been addressed in a European Commission study. Civil society and Members of Parliament call for the EU to become a Trans Champion and introduce an LGBT Roadmap.
 
Co-author Silvan Agius presented the study on Trans and Intersex Discrimination painting a bleak picture for trans and intersex people in the EU. Effective Legal protection against discrimination is lacking on European and national level. Trans and Intersex people fall between the cracks of a strict societal norm that only recognizes men and women. Negative attitudes towards trans and intersex people are directly related to the importance placed on a gender binary. Nevertheless he pointed out some progressive development on EU level and also within member states.
 
Transgender Europe’s Policy Officer Richard Köhler emphasized that the study proves the lack of effective protection and shows that measures undertaken by EU institutions have not been enough to boost trans equality. The human rights network demands that all trans people are to be protected by EU Gender Equality Legislation and that existing and future legislation needs to interpret the ground of “Sex” to also cover “Gender Identity” and “Gender Expression”. Discrimination against trans people is rampant in all EU countries. Trans people are amongst the first be dismissed or pushed into lower paying jobs.  Therefore, employment equality measures should specifically target trans people and employers. He also highlighted that many trans people are not able to access their EU rights because of inadequate gender recognition legislation on the national level. Forced sterilization, forced divorce, mandatory psychological treatment and real-life-experience are required in most EU countries to legally change name and gender. Therefore, Gender recognition laws need to be assessed on whether they are compatible with existing EU law.
 
Dan Ghattas  from Organisation Intersex International – Germany welcomed the study as being first legal analysis including also intersex people. OII considers intersex to be anyone who is born with a body that is not considered typical according to the norms in effect for standard male or female.
 
Elanore Saduskaite from the European Commission expressed great content with the quality of the study. She announced more research to be underway complementing the picture on how trans people experience victimization and discrimination. For the first time, the authoritative Discrimination Eurobarometer will also measure the general perception regarding trans people in all 27 EU countries.
 
Finnish Ombudswoman Pirkko Mäkinen called on the explicit inclusion of gender identity and gender expression in EU law. Her own country discusses currently to expand gender Equality legislation to explicitly cover also Gender Identity and Gender Expression. Similar to the UK, public institutions  would then pro-actively promote trans equality.
 
About 70 people attended the 2 hours seminar proving the prominence and importance of the subject. Members of the European Parliament called for an LGBTI Roadmap that would ensure that progress is made for trans and intersex people.
 
###
 
Download this Media Release here.
 
The Study can be ordered FOR FREE in English, French and German at: http://bookshop.europa.eu/en/trans-and-intersex-people-pbDS3212033/ 
 
 
For more information contact TGEU Policy Officer Richard Köhler at Richard [at] tgeu.org
 
Picture Copyright: European Parliament

MEDIA RELEASE by Transgender Europe and Transgender Equality Network Ireland

 There is no safe space for Transgender People!

Delegates of the Fourth European Transgender Council in Dublin harassed in the streets at night 

 

 

 

On Saturday September 8th three delegates of the fourth European Transgender Council where verbally harassed and physically attacked in the streets of Dublin when they were on their way to the conference party. One of the victims was Lauri Sivonen, Advisor to the Commissioner of Human Rights of the Council of Europe.

The attack shows striking similarities with an incident that occurred at the Third Transgender Council held in Malmoe (Sweden) in 2010 when delegates from Turkey where beaten up in front of a restaurant.

“This incidence is shocking for the whole conference” said just reelected co-chair of TGEU Wiktor Dynarski, “it leaves a bitter taste and again shows that there is no safe space for Transgender People in Europe.”

 

The motto of the Council is “Trans Rights Now: Realizing Recognition, Respect and Equality” and was organized by Transgender Europe in conjunction with Transgender Equality Network Ireland (TENI) and other local groups in Dublin. Over 250 activists and delegates from almost 40 countries reeceived a warm welcome to Ireland on Friday morning in the opening ceremony.

“This was an appalling incident. Ireland was delighted to host the Council and we have received an exceptional welcome from President Michael D. Higgins and the Lord Mayor of Dublin. Clearly there is a tremendous body of work to make our streets safe for all trans people,” said TENI Director Broden Giambrone.

 

This is the largest European Human rights event on transgender issues and one of the main themes is addressing hate crimes and violence. In the last four years 53 transgender people were reported murdered in Europe according to TGEU's Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide project. 79% of trans people have experienced negative comments, harassment, physical and sexual abuse and violence according to the European Hate Crime Study published by Press for Change in 2010. Violence and harassment are part of everyday life for most trans people.

Transgender Europe expresses its solidarity with our friends and all victims of violence in Europe.

“We are sad and angry and call upon An Garda Síochána to do everything to prosecute the perpetrators. Last night's attack showed once more that transphobia and racism are not only a problem of certain countries in Europe. Transphobia is everywhere”, says Kemal Ördek TGEU Steering Committee member and one of the victims of the attack.

 

END 

 

More than 1100 murdere trans people reported: TGEU Press Release (March 2013)

Trans Murder Monitoring Update March 2013 

Constant rise in murder rates: more than 1,100 reported murders of trans people in the last five years 

Transgender Europe: Press Release: March 12 2013

 

Constant rise in murder rates: Transgender Europe’s Trans Murder Monitoring project reveals more than 1,100 reported murders of trans people in the last five years

The Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) project started in April 2009 and systematically monitors, collects and analyses reports of homicides of trans people worldwide. Updates of the results are published two to three times a year on the website of the “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” project in the form of tables, name lists, and maps:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/tvt-project/tmm-results.htm

The March 2013 update reveals a total of 1,123 reported killings of trans people in 57 countries worldwide from January 1st 2008 to December 31st 2012. The update shows a significant/constant increase in reported killings of trans people over the last five years. In 2008, 148 cases were reported, in 2009 217 cases, in 2010 229 cases, in 2011 262 cases, and in 2012 267 cases. It is important to note that these cases are those that could be found through Internet research and through cooperation with trans organizations and activists. In most countries, data on murdered trans people are not systematically produced and it is impossible to estimate the numbers of unreported cases.

The increase suggests that on the one hand TGEU’s TVT research team has improved its monitoring methods, and received information from activists from many parts of the world. On the other it suggests that an increase in the visibility of trans people and of trans issues in public discourse may have led to a better reporting of cases. Clearly the shocking amount of violence against trans people still poses a major problem and threat to trans people in many countries. The alarming figures demonstrate once more that there is an urgent need to react to the violence against trans people and to seek mechanisms to protect trans people. Some international trans activists even started to introduce the term ‘transcide’ to reflect the continuously elevated level of deadly violence against trans people on a global scale.

Cases have been reported from all major World Regions (Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, North America, and Oceania), evoking an evermore gruesome picture, especially given the very partial knowledge we are able to gain in many places. More detailed information and a map showing the 1,123 reported murders of trans people is available at: www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en/tvt-project/tmm-results/march-2013.htm

Throughout all six world regions, the highest absolute numbers have been found in countries with strong trans movements and trans or LGBT organizations that do a professional monitoring: Brazil (452), Mexico (106), and Colombia (65) in Central and South America, the USA (69) in North America, Turkey (30) in Europe, and The Philippines (28) in Asia.

The close connection between the existence of strong trans movements and professional monitoring on the one hand, and highest absolute numbers of reports, on the other hand, point to a worrisome question: the question of unreported cases. Beside the need for mechanisms to protect trans people, this connection also shows the need for strong trans communities and organizations, which are capable of professional monitoring and reporting of violence against trans people. Furthermore this connection results in the fact, that the figures show only the tip of the iceberg of homicides of trans people on a worldwide scale.

Most reported cases were from Central and South America, which amount to 864 reports in 22 countries and account for 77 % of the globally reported murders of trans people since January 2008. In this region, there has been the strongest increase in reports (2008: 94, 2009: 165, 2010: 181, 2011: 206, and 2012: 218). In Brazil, the country with most reported killings (452 in total), there has been a steady increase (2008: 57, 2009: 68, 2010: 99, 2011: 103, 2012: 125). In Mexico, 106 cases have been reported in total, showing an even stronger increase each year (2008: 4, 2009: 9, 2010: 14, 2011: 33, 2012: 46). In Colombia, 65 killings have been reported in total since 2008 (2008: 13, 2009: 13, 2010: 15, 2011: 18, 2012: 6).

Killings of trans people in the region have also been reported from Argentina (19), Bolivia (9), Chile (4), Costa Rica (4), Cuba (2), Dominican Republic (14), Ecuador (11), Guatemala (36), Honduras (41), El Salvador (7), Jamaica (1), Nicaragua (4), Panama (2), Paraguay (5), Peru (11), Puerto Rico (9), and Uruguay (8), and Venezuela (54). Reports from some countries with smaller population sizes are also extremely worrying. While Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia have the highest absolute numbers, the relative numbers show even more worrisome results for some countries with smaller population sizes. Honduras, for instance, has a rate of 5.12 reported trans killings per million inhabitants, for Guatemala the rate is 2.83, and for Puerto Rico the rate is 2.43, while for Brazil the rate is 2.35, for Colombia the rate is 1.41, and for Mexico the rate is 0.94.

Thus, seen in relative numbers the situation in Honduras, Guatemala and Puerto Rico is even more severe than the one in Brazil, Mexico, or Colombia.

The new result update moreover reveals that in the last five years: 105 killings of trans people have been reported in Asia (2008: 17, 2009: 17, 2010: 29, 2011: 25, 2012: 17), in 15 countries (Afghanistan: 1, Azerbaijan: 2, Bangladesh: 1, Cambodia: 1, China: 6, India: 24, Indonesia: 7, Iran: 1, Iraq: 3, Malaysia: 6, Pakistan: 19, Philippines: 28, Republic of Korea: 1, Singapore: 1, and Thailand: 4); 71 killings of trans people have been reported in Europe (2008: 13, 2009: 20, 2010: 10, 2011: 14, 2012: 14), in 11 countries (Albania: 1, France: 2, Germany: 2, Italy: 20, Poland: 1, Portugal: 1, Russia: 2, Serbia: 1, Spain: 6, Turkey: 30, and UK: 5); 71 killings of trans people have been reported in North America (2008: 19, 2009: 13, 2010: 9, 2011: 16, 2012: 14), in 2 countries (Canada: 2, USA: 69); 8 killings of trans people have been reported in Africa (2008: 2, 2009: 1, 2010: 0, 2011: 1, 2012: 4), in 4 countries (Algeria: 1, Mauritius: 1, Uganda: 1, South Africa: 5); 4 killings of trans people have been reported in Oceania (2008: 3, 2009: 1, 2010: 0, 2011: 0, 2012: 0), in 4 countries (Australia: 1, Fiji: 1, New Caledonia: 1, and New Zealand: 1). Attached to this press release you can find a map, which demonstrates the absolute figures of reports found worldwide since January 2008.

While the documentation of killings of trans people is indispensable for demonstrating the shocking extent of human rights violations committed against trans people on a global scale, there is also a need for in-depth research of various other aspects related to the human rights situation of trans people. Therefore, Transgender Europe developed the Trans Murder Monitoring project into the ‘Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide’ research project (TvT). TvT is a comparative, ongoing qualitative-quantitative research project, which provides an overview of the human rights situation of trans people in different parts of the world and develops useful data and advocacy tools for international institutions, human rights organizations, the trans movement and the general public. In November 2012 Transgender Europe published the TvT research report “TRANSRESPECT VERSUS TRANSPHOBIA WORLDWIDE - A Comparative Review of the Human-rights Situation of Gender-variant/Trans People”, which discusses and contextualizes the key findings of the TvT project. You can download the research report here: http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/uploads/downloads/Publications/TvT_research-report.pdf

If you have further questions or if you want to support the research project, please contact Transgender Europe’s Senior Researcher Dr Carsten Balzer

research@transrespect-transphobia.org www.transrespect-transphobia.org  

Nuts & bolts for LGBT human rights in Third Countries - EU adopts LGBT- toolkit

TGEU-logo
 
The Working Group on Human Rights of the EU – COHOM has adopted a toolkit to promote the Enjoyment of all Human Rights by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender - LGBT people. The LGBT-toolkit provides EU-staff as well as Civil Society in third countries with concrete tools and suggestions on how to protect and actively support the Human Rights of LGBT people.
 
The toolkit entails a check-list with concrete questions identifying the most crucial Human Rights areas for LGBT-people worldwide. During the presentation it was stressed that the toolkit is a “living instrument” and that much attention will be put on its implementation, e.g. by including LGBT-issues in the Human Rights training for EU-diplomats.
 
Transgender Europe - TGEU - has been invited to the presentation and previously addressed COHOM on issues transgender people face worldwide.
 
Richard Köhler, TGEU-Steering Committee member says: “We are impressed by the pace and comprehensiveness the toolkit was designed with. The toolkit provides the nuts and bolts to a strong political commitment of the EU: trans issues are human rights issues and this position is non-negotiable. Though, transgender issues are not yet fully represented in its complexity, TGEU will make its contribution to have them comprehensively covered.”
 
The need for it is obvious. “There are many countries, in which certain laws are specifically used to persecute and arrest trans people: so-called anti-crossdressing laws, laws that do not allow gender reassignment and public nuisance laws to name only a few. There are also countries, in which trans people are being subjected to harassment and physical violence directly from police officers or under their approval. Furthermore our research shows an increase in the numbers of reported murders of trans people in recent years.” says Dr. Carsten Balzer, head of Transgender Europe’s “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” research project.
 
LGBT-Human Rights activists are strongly encouraged to use and promote the LGBT-toolkit.
Kati Leinonen, from the Human Rights Unit of the Council of the EU, stressed that input from NGOs and activists is very important, so they can raise it in their work with Third Countries. Leinonen emphasized, that though there might be EU-structures in the countries, civil society might have valuable knowledge about instances, they would never hear of otherwise.
 
Brussels, July 2, 2010
ENDS
 
More information on TGEU and the “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” research project can be found here: www.tgeu.org www.transrespect-transphobia.org
 
Contact: tgeu@tgeu.org 

 

 

Press Release TGEU on brutal attacks on Transgender Remembrance in Kiev

 

Commemoration brutally defiled - Transgender Day of Remembrance in Kiev attacked
For IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov, 22nd 2010
 
The European network, Transgender Europe, is shocked over the brutal attack on the Transgender Day of Remembrance -TDoR in Kiev on Nov 20th.
 
In, what was obviously a planned attack, about ten masked men broke into the Visual Culture Center during a film screening, attacked the over thirty spectators with tear-gas and brutal violence and escaped unknown. Organizers of the event, who tried to stop them got beaten up, suffer as a result from internal injuries and facial chemical burn. All spectators present in the room during the attack suffered from tear-gas. The local Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender NGO “Insight” call the attack planned. “The attackers were wearing masks, they had weapons, their actions were consistent and deliberate, and they fled the scene at once.” The TDoR-event was publicly announced before. This and the stage of planning disqualify the police’s anticipation of the attack as "hooliganism".
 
 “It is an act of barbarism to violate the mourning of the death. This act of cowardice was not only targeted at the transgender community as whole but against everybody, who believes in the right to self-determination.” says Richard Köhler, co-chair of the Human Rights NGO Transgender Europe.
 
Reminding that Ukraine signed up to the Council of Ministers Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)5, TGEU calls upon the police and the general prosecutor to investigate this planned attack as a hate crime and threat to the freedom of public assembly of LGBT people and to bring the perpetrators to justice.
“Attacks like this and the ignorance of the police reinforce an atmosphere of Transphobia. TGEU’s Trans Murder Monitoring project found almost 180 reports of murdered trans people worldwide in the last 12 months, the majority victims of transphobic hate crime” adds Dr. Carsten Balzer, lead-researcher of the TGEU research project Transrespect versus Transphobic Worldwide.
 
The Transgender Day of Remembrance is held worldwide, each year on November 20th. On this day, transgender people and others, who present themselves differently to common gender expressions, who got murdered are honored and remembered. In 2010 the TDoR was held in 40 cities in 14 countries in Europe.
END
 
Transgender Europe
Contact: tgeu@tgeu.org
www.tgeu.org
www.transrespect-transphobia.org/

 

AttachmentSize
download this press release136.41 KB

TGEU Announcement & Documentation: More than 100 groups worldwide oppose Trans Pathologization

Transgender Europe (TGEU) Announcement & Documentation:   More than 100 groups worldwide oppose Trans Pathologization

Five weeks before the heyday of this year’s “Stop Trans Pathologization: Goal 2012” campaign already 4 international Networks and 110 trans groups and allies from 30 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and North and South America have joined the campaign of the Trans Depathologization Network.

Map showing the worldwide campaign

On October 17th the heyday of this year’s campaign demonstrations will take place in 28 cities in 17 countries in Europe and North and South America (Date of information: 12.09.2009). Transgender Europe (TGEU), which is supporting the campaign and calling upon its member organizations and other European trans organizations as well as our allies in other world regions to join the campaign and organise actions in their cities or countries, documents the campaign and its supporters on the TGEU website (http://www.tgeu.org/node/78) in English. The Steering Committee of TGEU has adopted three additional demands in relation to the campaign’s principal demand: “The Removal of Gender Identity Disorder from the DSM and ICD.” These additional demands are:

The creation of an alternative non-pathologizing category in the ICD 11, recognizing that our gender identities are not mental health disorders while still enabling hormonal and surgical medical assistance to be provided for those trans-people who seek such assistance. The funding of hormonal and surgical medical assistance for trans people by national health insurance The creation of processes for changing legal name and gender without compulsory treatment or any form of diagnosis.

However, every trans organization joining the campaign is free to choose their demands as long as the principal demand is supported. We encourage participating organisations to choose their additional demands to best reflect their current national medical and legal situations. If you want to confirm the participation of your group, please send an email to research[at]tgeu.org with the subject “JOIN STP 2012” and the following information: Group / organization name: Logo: Country: City: Message: We join the campaign “Stop Trans Pathologization-2012

TGEU Announcement Update: More than 160 groups worldwide oppose Trans Pathologization

Transgender Europe (TGEU) Announcement Update:

More than 160 groups worldwide oppose Trans Pathologization

 Two weeks before the heyday of this year’s “Stop Trans Pathologization: Goal 2012” campaign already 7 international Networks and 161 trans groups and allies from 37 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and North and South America have joined the campaign of the Trans Depathologization Network. On October 17th the heyday of this year’s campaign demonstrations will take place in 30 cities in 18 countries in Europe, Asia, North and South America (Date of information: 05.10.2009).  

 

Map showing the worldwide campaign

Transgender Europe (TGEU), which is supporting the campaign and calling upon its member organizations and other European trans organizations as well as our allies in other world regions to join the campaign and organise actions in their cities or countries, documents the campaign and its supporters on the TGEU website (http://www.tgeu.org/node/75) in English. The Steering Committee of TGEU has adopted three additional demands in relation to the campaign’s principal demand: “The Removal of Gender Identity Disorder from the DSM and ICD.”

These additional demands are:

The creation of an alternative non-pathologizing category in the ICD 11, recognizing that our gender identities are not mental health disorders while still enabling hormonal and surgical medical assistance to be provided for those trans-people who seek such assistance. The funding of hormonal and surgical medical assistance for trans people by national health insurance. The creation of processes for changing legal name and gender without compulsory treatment or any form of diagnosis.  

However, every trans organization joining the campaign is free to choose their demands as long as the principal demand is supported. We encourage participating organisations to choose their additional demands to best reflect their current national medical and legal situations. If you want to confirm the participation of your group, please send an email to research[at]tgeu.org with the subject “JOIN STP 2012” and the following information:

Group / organization name: Logo: Country: City: Message: We join the campaign “Stop Trans Pathologization-2012 It is also possible for individuals to support the campaign. If you want to support the campaign, please send an email to research[at]tgeu.org with the subject “I SUPPORT STP 2012” and the following information: Name: Country: City: Message: I support the campaign “Stop Trans Pathologization-2012  

TGEU Media Release: Launch of TvT research report on 11 December 2012

Transgender Europe Publication

Transgender Europe Media Release:

Launch of TvT research report

 

Transgender Europe’s TvT research team will launch today the report on the human rights situation of gender-variant/ trans people at the 26th ILGA World conference in Stockholm (Sweden).

 

TGEU's Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide (TvT) research project
presents key findings from a Legal and Health Care Mapping and the Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM).
 
TMM is a a systematic collection, monitoring and analysis of reported killings of gender-variant/trans people
worldwide. The Legal and Health Care Mapping provides an overview of proposed and existing laws, and actual legal and health-care practices relevant to gender-variant/trans people.

 Read the Press Release here

 Download the Report and the Mapping here.

TGEU Statement: Norwegian Ombud decides forced sterilisation is discrimination

TGEU Statement  Norwegian Ombud decides forced sterilisation is discrimination: there is no good argument to uphold current practice

15 Sept 2014

 

TGEU welcomes the decision of the Norwegian Equality Body outlawing forced sterilisation, necessary for a change of gender marker, as discriminatory. On Sept 9, the Norwegian Equality Ombud Ørstavik, took a decision in the case of John Jeanette Solstad Remø. The Equality Body found that the responsible Ministry of Health could not provide substantive arguments to uphold the sterilization requirement, but referred to an practice established since the 50s. Remø had complained about the requirement to undergo sterilisation before being recognized as female.

Norwegian Ombud Sunniva Ørstavik commented: “The health authorities provide no justification for that one should have to go through these major physical changes in order to live as one feels. This requirement is contrary to the Anti-Discrimination Act.”

“The current practice smells of discrimination and shameful history. It is high time that this changes.”

John Jeanette Remø says: “I had hoped for this conclusion, and would be surprised if it was possible to arrive at anything else. But this is a big day, an important milestone.”

Stein Wolff Frydenlund, TGEU Steering Committee member, comments: “The Ministry of Health has now time until Mid October to submit their comments to the decision. However, it is unlikely that they will challenge the decision.”

TGEU Executive Director Julia Ehrt comments: “ We welcome this decision as long-time overdue. However, it now needs swift legal implementation. We call on policy makers to go further and remove also other medical aspects, such as a mandatory mental health diagnosis, from Norwegian legal gender recognition procedures. Medical and legal issues need to be completely separated in what should be a simple administrative procedure. ”

The case received significant attention in Norway, a country traditionally proud of its human rights record as Amnesty International Norway had started a petition for John Jeanette.

### ENDS

Transgender Europe is a European human rights NGO working for the human rights and equality of all trans people. More Information: www.tgeu.org 

Transgender or Trans is an umbrella term for people whose gender identity or expression differs from the sex assigned to them at birth. 

TGEU Senior Policy Officer Richard Köhler is available for interviews and questions and can be reached at:

email: Richard [replace this bracket with the at sign] tgeu.org

phone: +49 (0)30 5360 2668

AttachmentSize
TGEU Statement: Norwegian Ombud decides forced sterilisation is discrimination (.pdf)56.4 KB

TGEU welcomes Commissioner for Human Rights Human Rights Comment on LGBTI Children

TGEU welcomes Commissioner for Human Rights Human Rights Comment on LGBTI Children

Today, Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights Nils Muižnieks published a Human Rights comment LGBTI children have the right to safety and equality. The Commissioner is concerned about the high levels of bullying and harassment LGBTI children face and stresses that all children have the right to be free from violence.

Focusing on trans and intersex minors he points out their right to self-determination:

"Trans and intersex children encounter specific obstacles when exercising their right to self-determination. As minors, trans adolescents can find it difficult to access trans-specific health and support services while intersex children are often subjected to irreversible “normalising” treatments soon after birth without their consent. The legal recognition of trans and intersex children’s sex or gender remains a huge hurdle in most countries. Children are rights-holders and they must be listened to in decision-making that concerns them. Sex or gender assigning treatment should be based on fully informed consent."

According to Muiznieks it is in the best interest of the child to obtain un-biased information about sexual and gender diversity. Whereas, there is no evidence that dissemination of information advocating a positive attitude towards LGBTI people would adversely affect children.

Transgender Europe welcomes this strong call for the protection of a very vulnerable group, that is dealing with a myriad of issues. Homelessness and expulsion from their families is a risk many young trans people face. Also, they are not only affected by harassment but also face service denial in crucial areas such as health. Trans-specific medical treatments are often only available for adults, leaving underage trans people at great levels of distress and suffering.

“Still, 43 states in Europe deny young persons their right to self-determination, by having no gender recognition procedures or making them available only to adults. Having one’s gender identity officially recognized positively impacts young trans people’s social inclusion, well-being and school performance. We welcome the Commissioner’s call for gender recognition procedures that are considerate of young trans persons. To have a say in all matters that concern a young person is a human right as defined under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.” explains Richard Köhler, TGEU Senior Policy Officer.

“This also extends to respecting young trans people’s choice of name, pronouns and gendered facilities. Educational and other professional institutions should adjust their routines to support and protect young trans people and their families. ” says TGEU co-chair Alecs Recher:

“Because, trans children are only happy children once their rights to education, health, family and self-determination are a reality.”

ENDS

Human Rights Comment LGBTI Children have the right to safety and equality: http://www.coe.int/en/web/commissioner/-/lgbti-children-have-the-right-t...

Transgender Europe is a European human rights NGO working for the human rights and equality of all trans people. More Information: www.tgeu.org

Transgender or Trans is an umbrella term for people whose gender identity or expression differs from the sex assigned to them at birth.

TGEU Senior Policy Officer Richard Köhler is available for interviews and questions and can be reached at:

email: richard@tgeu.org

phone: +49 (0)30 5360 2668

Transgender Europe congratulates Poland on its political success

First openly transgender Member of Parliament elected

Transgender Europe congratulates Poland on its political success

 

On October 10th, we have learned that Anna Grodzka, president of TGEU member organization Trans-Fuzja, has become the first openly transgender woman to be elected into Polish parliament.

Grodzka, who has been working for transgender and intersex issues for more than 4 years now, was a candidate of the Palikot Movement, a new political party which has come forward with progressive ideas especially on LGBTQI matters during elections.

TGEU compliments also Robert Biedroń for his seat at the Polish Parliament. Robert has been active as an openly gay LGBT activist and politician. He is from the Palikot’s movement and has been elected in the Gdynia District.

“This is an incredible step forward for Poland” says Wiktor Dynarski, TGEU CEE Working Group coordinator. “We were aware of the fact that Anna's decision to actually become a candidate would bring a lot more discussion on transgender issues into Polish politics, but we have never even dreamt of achieving such an incredible success!”

TGEU salutes Poland and hopes that a public transgender figure will increase visibility of transgender and intersex individuals in Poland and the issues they face. Currently, many trans and intersex individuals in the country feel unsafe and unheard. An important improvement would be a law regulating the recognition of change of name and gender. Currently, this is only ruled by case law. No law or official decree exists leaving transgender individuals in state of legal uncertainty. 

Commissioner for Human Rights, Thomas Hammarberg identified Poland [1] to be amongst those countries not providing for “quick, transparent and accessible” mechanisms as recommended by the Committee of Ministers[2]. Hammarberg demands from member states to fulfill their positive obligation to provide for legal gender recognition, as established repeatedly by the European Court for Human Rights and European Court of Justice. 

“Poland has ignored the rights of its transgender citizens for long. It is high time to finally discuss introduction of a gender recognition law. We are optimistic that Grodzka's success will motivate more countries in the Central-Eastern European region to take notice of the existence of transgender and intersex persons and their rights” hopes TGEU Co-chair, Richard Köhler.

END

 

 

Transgender Europe – TGEU is a European third sector, umbrella organization, which works towards the full equality and inclusion of all trans people in Europe.
 
 
Transgender Europe                                   
www.tgeu.org                                               
Contact: tgeu@tgeu.org
 
 
 

 

 

[1]              “Discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity” (2011) by Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe Thomas Hammarberg
 
 
picture: courtesy of Anna Grodzka

 

-->

Transgender Europe welcomes Creation of European Intersex Human Rights Organization

oii Europe logo

Transgender Europe welcomes Creation of European Intersex Human Rights Organization

March 5th 2013
 
On December 10th 2012, Europe’s first Umbrella-Intersex-NGO was founded during the Second Intersex Forum at Stockholm. Transgender Europe congratulates the founding members to their decision to give intersex persons and their concerns a common platform and cohesive voice at the European level.
 
OII Europe says in its press release it will work for the respect of intersex people’s human rights at European and national levels, and offer information and training to other NGOs and government bodies. The organization reminds that intersex persons are still exposed to ‘normalization’ practices all over Europe, often outside legal regulation. The new umbrella NGO warns that pathologization of intersex individuals results in gross human rights violations, abusing bodily integrity and personal dignity. TGEU recognizes similar practices of pathologizing, silencing, shaming and socially excluding of trans and intersex people rendering their experiences and existences invisible. 
OII Europe commits to a set of human rights principles that were reaffirmed by the 2nd Intersex Forum in Stockholm. Demanding their full Human and Citizenship Rights for intersex persons, the delegates call in particular for: an end to mutilating and ‘normalizing’ practices as well as selective abortion on the grounds of intersex; informed consent of the individual concerned for any medical treatments; supportive and safe spaces as well as psycho-social and peer support for intersex individuals, their families and care providers. Further on, they demand full access to medical records for intersex individuals and the acknowledgement and redress for suffered injustice, caused in the past.
 
OII Europe pronounces that it will engage with a range of state and non-state actors. Taking up the call from the Forum towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex  -  LGBTI organizations to take intersex issues fully on board, TGEU expresses its support for the human rights struggle of intersex people. Transgender Europe looks forward to work in close partnership with OII Europe and wishes it all the best on its way.
 
###
ABOUT OII EUROPE:
More information on OII Europe is available here: www.oiieurope.org
The full set of demands from the 2nd Intersex Forum can be read here: www.tgeu.org/Second_Intersex_Forum_reaffirms_Human_Rights_principles
 
ABOUT TRANSGENDER EUROPE
TGEU is a European Human Rights Organization with membership in 36 countries working for equality and inclusion of all trans people. www.tgeu.org  
 
 
WHAT IS INTERSEX?
OII defines intersex to refer to a person who "may have the biological attributes of both sexes or lack some of the biological attributes considered necessary to be defined as one or the other sex. Intersex is always congenital and can originate from genetic, chromosomal or hormonal variations. Environmental influences such as endocrine disruptors can also play a role in some intersex differences. The term is not applicable to situations where individuals deliberately alter their own anatomical characteristics."
 

 

Transgender Europe: IDAHOT Press Release – 17th May, 2011

Trans Murder Monitoring unveils interactive map of more than 600 reported murders of trans people since 2008

On 17th May, The International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT) is being held in more than 70 countries around the world. The IDAHOT is meant to raise awareness regarding the ongoing discrimination and violence committed by states, societies and individuals against lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer people on various scales, from homo- and transphobic legislations and forms of state repression to hate crimes including insults, attacks and murders. The day was first held in 2005 with activities in many countries of the world, after a year-long international campaigning effort that was initiated by French academic Louis-Georges Tin. The 17th of May was chosen to remember the removal of homosexuality from the International Classification of Diseases of the World Health Organization (WHO) on 17th May, 1990.

In 2009, IDAHOT campaigns strongly focused on transphobia, responding to the fact that trans people in many countries of the world are incomparably more vulnerable to discrimination and violence, including murder, than other groups. The name of the day was changed from ‘International Day Against Homophobia’ (IDAHO) to ‘International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia’. Along with many other activists, we now use the acronym ‘IDAHOT’ in order to increase visibility of transphobic violence.

Trans Murder Monitoring launches an interactive map for IDAHOT 2011. The Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) projectwas initiated in April 2009 in order to systematically monitor, collect and analyse reports of homicides of trans people worldwide. Updates of the preliminary results are published on the website of the ‘Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide’ (TvT) research project two to three times a year in form of tables, name lists, and maps. The new interactive map for the first time visualises a great portion of the 604 reported murders of trans people that the TMM has documented since January 2008. The interactive TMM map can be accessed on the TvT website:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/tvt-project/tmm-results.htm/idahot-2011

For each case, details regarding name, age, location, cause of death, circumstances of the killing and a follow-up are shown if available. The map will be updated on a continuous basis, so that new reported murders will appear as they are documented by the TMM. You can find this map here:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/tvt-project/tmm-results/all-tmm-reports-since-2008.htm

In the first four and a half months of 2011, 55 reported murders of trans people have been registered. Sadly, from 1 January to 17 May 2011, the TMM already registered 55 murders in 19 countries, with the majority in Brazil (20); Mexico (5); and Argentina, Colombia, the Philippines and the USA (3). Further murders have been reported in Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Turkey and Venezuela. These are only preliminary results, and the numbers are likely to grow even larger during the course of the year. While often the actual circumstances of the killings remain obscure due to lacking investigation and reports, many of the cases documented involve an extreme extent of aggression, including torture and mutilation. Many cases are not investigated properly by the authorities.

The murder of the 21 year-old Jessica, in the Colombian city of Bogota, is among the most recent shocking cases.On 27 March, 2011, the travesti and sex worker Jessica was stabbed on the street and the perpetrator fled. Colleagues brought Jessica to the hospital, where she was however not provided immediate treatment. Her colleagues say Jessica died in hospital due to this failure.

Apart from Jessica, the ever-growing TMM archive has registered numerous cases in 49 different countries since 2008, most of which hardly received any public attention at all.

In total, the preliminary TMM results show more than 600 reports of murdered trans people in almost 50 countries since January 2008

The new update reveals that since January 2008, 2 homicides of trans people were reported in Africa (2008: 1, 2009: 1), 50 in Asia (2008: 11, 2009: 14, 2010: 17, Jan.-May 2011: 8), 465 in Central and South America (2008: 92; 2009: 162; 2010: 171; Jan.-May 2011: 40), 41 in Europe (2008: 11, 2009: 17, 2010: 9, Jan.-May 2011: 4), 4 in Oceania (2008: 3, 2009: 1), and 42 in the USA (2008: 17, 2009: 14, 2010: 8, Jan.-May: 2011: 3).

These figures are composed of the following countries:

Africa: Algeria (1) and South Africa (1) Asia: Azerbaijan (2), China (6), India (7), Indonesia (4), Iran (1), Iraq (3), Malaysia (6), Pakistan (8), Philippines (9), Republic of Korea (1), Singapore (1), and Thailand (2) Central and South America: Argentina (11), Bolivia (6) Brazil (247), Chile (2), Colombia (29), Costa Rica (3), Cuba (1), the Dominican Republic (9), Ecuador (9), El Salvador (6), Guatemala (29), Honduras (28), Jamaica (1), Mexico (32), Nicaragua (2), Paraguay (3), Peru (7), Puerto Rico (7), Uruguay (1), and Venezuela (32) Europe: Albania (1), Germany (2) Italy (13), Poland (1), Portugal (1), Russia (1), Spain (3), Serbia (1), Turkey (15), and UK (3) North America: USA (42) Oceania: Australia (1), Fiji (1), New Caledonia (1) and New Zealand (1)

Yet, we know, even these high numbers are only a fraction of the real figures; the truth is much worse. While in several Middle and South American countries forms of reporting and monitoring exist, in most African countries this is not the case, making it extremely difficult to gain knowledge of murdered trans people.

Transgender Europe developed the Trans Murder Monitoring into the ‘Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide’ research project. While the documentation of homicides against trans people is indispensable for demonstrating the shocking extent of human rights violations committed against trans people on a global scale, there is also a need for in-depth research of various other aspects related to the human rights situation of trans people. Therefore, the project Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide (TvT) was designed as a comparative research project that provides an overview of the human rights situation of trans people in different parts of the world. It develops advocacy tools for international institutions, human rights organizations and the trans movement and provides knowledge for the general public. The TvT research team cooperates with over 15 partner organizations in Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, North America, and Oceania. The TvT project is funded by the Open Society Foundations, the ARCUS Foundation, and partly by the Heinrich Boell Foundation. In September 2010, the TvT team started a survey on the human rights situation of trans people worldwide in cooperation with its partner organizations. The first results of this survey will be presented soon at international conferences and on the TvT website.

If you have further questions or if you want to support the research project,

 please contact the TvT research team:

Dr Carsten Balzer and Dr Jan Simon Hutta

research[at]transrespect-transphobia.org

or check our website:

www.transrespect-transphobia.org

 

 

Transgender Europe: Press Release: November 18th 2009

Deutsche Version weiter unten!     ¡Para la versión en castellano ir hacia abajo!

Transgender Europe’s Trans Murder Monitoring Project reveals more than 160 murders of trans people in the last 12 months

 

The 11th International Transgender Day of Remembrance is being held, this November in more than 120 cities worldwide:  Since 1999 the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), in which those trans people who have been victims of homicide will be remembered, takes place every November. The TDOR raises public awareness of hate crimes against trans people, provides a space for publicly mourning and honours the lives of those trans people who might otherwise be forgotten. Started in the U.S.A., the TDOR is now held in many parts of the world. This year the TDOR takes place in more than 120 cities in 17 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and Oceania on November 20th. Sadly, this year there are more than 160 trans persons to be added to the list, to be remembered, mourned and honoured as an update of the preliminary results of Transgender Europe’s new research project reveals. The data collected by the Trans Murder Monitoring Project research team comes from a systematic monitoring, collecting and analysing news reports of the deaths of trans  people worldwide. It has has revealed a total of 162 cases of reported murders of trans people from November 20th 2008 to November 12th 2009. In the first 10 ½ months of 2009 already 150 murders of trans people have been reported.  Yet, we know, even these high numbers are only a fraction of the real figures. The truth is much worse. These are only the reported cases which could be found through internet research. There is no formal data and it is impossible to estimate the numbers of unreported cases. Cases have been reported from all six major World regions: North and Latin America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Most reported cases have been from Latin America and North America, with the majority from Brazil (41), Venezuela (22), Honduras (16) and the U.S.A. (13). In total 124 murders of trans people were reported in 15 Latin American countries in the last year. The reported murders of trans people in Latin America account for 75 % of the world wide reported murders of trans people in the last year. The recent update of the preliminary results also reveal that 16 murders of trans people have been reported in 6 European countries (Italy, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom) in the last year.  In Asia murders of trans people were reported in India and Malaysia, in Africa in Algeria, and in Oceania for New Zealand. In total the preliminary results show reports of murdered trans people in 26 countries in the last year. The update of the preliminary results of TGEU’s Trans Murder Monitoring Project is presented in form of tables, name lists, and maps on the TGEU Website in English, Spanish, and German. The English version of the tables can be found at www.tgeu.org/tdor2009english. There you will also find information on the International Transgender Day of Remembrance as well as a list of all cities, in which the International Transgender Day of Remembrance will be held. Transgender Europe Contacts: Carsten Balzer, PhD and Astrid Suess, MA research[at]tgeu.org

 

Transgender Europe: Presse-Erklärung vom 18. November 2009 Das Trans Murder Monitoring-Projekt von Transgender Europe zeigt mehr als 160 Morde an Trans-Personen in den letzten 12 Monaten  

Der 11. Internationale Transgender Day of Remembrance (Transgender Tag des Erinnerns) findet in mehr als 120 Städten weltweit statt.:  Seit 1999 findet der Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), in welchem jener Trans-Personen gedacht wird, die Opfer von Tötungsdelikten wurden, jeden November statt. Der TDOR macht die Öffentlichkeit auf Hassverbrechen gegen Trans-Personen aufmerksam und schafft einen öffentlichen Raum für das Trauern um und das Ehren jener Trans-Personen, die sonst vergessen würden. Ursprünglich aus den USA stammend, findet der TDOR mittlerweile in vielen Teilen der Welt statt. Dieses Jahr finden Veranstaltungen zum TDOR in mehr als 120 Städten in 17 Ländern in Afrika, Asien, Europa, Nordamerika und Ozeanien am 20. November statt. Traurigerweise, müssen dieses Jahr mehr als 160 Menschen zur Liste jener, die erinnert, betrauert und geehrt werden, hinzugefügt werden, wie eine Aktualisierung der vorläufigen Ergebnisse von Transgender Europes neuem Forschungsprojekt, dem „Trans Murder Monitoring“-Projekt, offenbart.   Die vom Forschungsteam des Trans Murder Monitoring Projekt zusammengestellten Daten entspringen einer systematischen Erfassung, Zusammenstellung und Analyse von Todesfällen von Trans-Personen weltweit. Sie offenbaren eine Gesamtzahl von 162 berichteten Fällen ermordeter Trans-Personen zwischen 20. November 2008 und 12. November 2009. Bereits in den ersten 10 ½ Monaten von 2009 wurden 150 Morde an Trans-Personen berichtet. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass selbst diese extrem hohen Zahlen nur ein Bruchteil der tatsächlichen Zahlen darstellen. Die Realität sieht viel schlimmer aus. Dies sind lediglich die berichteten Fälle, die durch eine Internet-Recherche gefunden werden können. Offizielle Daten existieren nicht und ebenso wenig Schätzungen der Dunkelziffern, die nicht möglich sind. Die Fälle wurden aus allen sechs Weltregionen berichtet: aus Nord- und Lateinamerika, Europa, Afrika, Asien sowie aus Ozeanien. Die meisten Fälle wurden für Nord- und Lateinamerika berichtet, mit der überwiegenden Mehrheit der Fälle in Brasilien (41), Venezuela (22), Honduras (16) und den U.S.A. (13). Insgesamt wurden im letzten Jahr 124 Morde an Trans-Personen in 15 lateinamerikanischen Ländern berichtet. Die aus Lateinamerika berichteten Morde machen 75 % der Gesamtzahl der berichteten Morde im letzten Jahr aus. Die jüngste Aktualisierung der vorläufigen Ergebnisse offenbaren des Weiteren, dass 16 Morden an Trans-Personen in 6 europäischen Ländern (Italien, Russland, Serbien, Spanien, Türkei und das Vereinigte Königreich) im letzten Jahr berichtet wurden. In Asien wurden Morde an Trans-Personen in Indien und Malaysia, in Afrika in Algerien und in Ozeanien in in Neuseeland berichtet.   Insgesamt zeigen die vorläufigen Ergebnisse Berichte über ermordete Trans-Personen in 26 Ländern im vergangenen Jahr. Die Aktualisierung der vorläufigen Ergebnisse von Transgender Europes Trans Murder Monitoring Projekt wird in Form von Namenslisten, Statistiken und Karten in deutscher, englischer und spanischer Sprache auf der Webseite von Transgender Europe präsentiert. Die deutsche Präsentation der Ergebnisse ist unter www.tgeu.org/tdor2009deutsch zu finden. An dieser Stelle finden sich zudem weitere Informationen zum Internationalen Transgender Day of Remembrance sowie eine Liste aller Orte, an denen Veranstaltungen zum Transgender Day of Remembrance stattfinden.

Transgender Europe Kontakt: Dr. Carsten Balzer und Astrid Suess, MA research[at]tgeu.org  

Transgender Europe: Nota de prensa del 18 de noviembre de 2009 Una actualización reciente del Observatorio de Personas Trans Asesinadas de Transgender Europe muestra que en los últimos 12 meses se han registrado más de 160 asesinatos de personas trans.

 

En este mes de noviembre, más de 120 ciudades de todo el mundo realizarán actos con motivo del 11º Día Internacional de Conmemoración Trans. Desde 1999, cada mes de noviembre tiene lugar el Día Internacional de Conmemoración Trans (TDOR) en el que personas trans recuerdan a personas trans que han sido víctimas de homicidios. El TDOR tiene como objetivo concienciar al público sobre la existencia de los crímenes de odio contra personas trans, crear un espacio público para el duelo, y honrar las vidas de aquellas personas trans que, de otra manera, podrían caer en el olvido.  Iniciado originalmente en EE.UU., el Día Internacional de Conmemoración Trans actualmente se realiza en muchas partes del mundo. Este año tendrá lugar en más de 120 ciudades de 17 países en los continentes de África, Asia, Europa, Norteamérica y Oceanía. Desgraciadamente, este año tenemos que recordar, echar de menos y honrar a más de 160 personas trans, como muestra la última actualización de los resultados preliminares del nuevo proyecto de investigación de Transgender Europe. Los datos recogidos por el equipo de investigación del Observatorio de Personas Trans Asesinadas que provienen de la observación, la recogida y del análisis sistemático de los registros de muertes de personas trans a escala mundial, revelan un total de 162 asesinatos registrados de personas trans en todo el mundo entre el 20 de noviembre de 2008 y el 12 de noviembre de 2009. En los primeros 10 meses y medio de 2009, se han registrado 150 asesinatos de personas trans. Debe tenerse en cuenta que incluso estos números tan altos sólo constituyen una pequeña parte de los datos verdaderos, que son mucho peores. Estos tan sólo son los casos registrados que ha sido posible encontrar a través de Internet. No existen datos formales ni estimaciones posibles sobre los casos no registrados. Los casos registrados provienen de las seis regiones del mundo: Norteamérica, América Latina, Europa, África, Asia y Oceanía. La mayoría de los casos se han registrado en América Latina y Norteamérica, constatándose los números más altos en Brasil (41), Venezuela (22), Honduras (16) y EE.UU. (13). En total, a lo largo del último año se registraron 124 asesinatos de personas trans en 15 países latinoamericanos, representando un 76,5% de los asesinatos de personas trans registrados mundialmente en la misma franja de tiempo.  La última actualización de los resultados preliminares también muestra que, en este año pasado, se registraron 16 asesinatos de personas trans en 6 países europeos (España, Italia, Reino Unido, Rusia, Serbia y Turquía). En Asia, se registraron casos de personas trans asesinadas en India y Malasia, en África en Algeria, y en Oceanía en Nueva Zelanda. En total, los resultados preliminares muestran registros de personas trans asesinadas en 26 países en el último año. La página web de Transgender Europe presenta la última actualización de los resultados preliminares del Observatorio de Personas Trans Asesinadas en forma de tablas, listas de nombres y mapas, en inglés, español y alemán. La versión española de las tablas se encuentra en www.tgeu.org/tdor2009español donde también se puede consultar información sobre el Día Internacional de Conmemoración Trans, así como una lista de todas las ciudades en las que se realizará el Día Internacional de Conmemoración Trans. Contacto de Transgender Europe Dr Carsten Balzer y Astrid Suess, DEA E-mail: research[at]tgeu.org  

Transgender Europe’s Trans Murder Monitoring: Again alarming figures

TGEU Logo

Trans Murder Monitoring project reveals more than 800 reported murders of trans people in the last four years

 

The Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) project started in April 2009 and systematically monitors, collects and analyses reports of homicides of trans people worldwide.Updates of the preliminary results are published two to three times a year on the website of the “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” project in the form of tables, name lists, and maps:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/tvt-project/tmm-results.htm

The March 2012 update reveals a total of 816 reported killings of trans people in 55 countries worldwide from January 1st 2008 to December 31st 2011. The update shows an exponential increase in reported killings of trans people over the last four years. In 2008, 141 cases were reported, in 2009 213 cases, in 2010 214 cases, and in 2011 a shocking number of 248. These are mainly the reported cases that could be found through Internet research and cooperation with trans organizations and activists. In most countries, data on murdered trans people are not systematically produced and it is impossible to estimate the numbers of unreported cases.

The reasons for this increase might be manifold. Every year, TGEU’s TVT research team has improved its monitoring methods, started new collaborations with organizations that contributed their data, and received information from activists from many parts of the world. Also, the increase in the visibility of trans people and of trans issues in public discourse may have led to a better reporting of cases. However, the data also show also that there is no decrease, that the shocking amount of violence against trans people still poses a major problem and threat to trans people in many countries. The again alarming figures demonstrate once more that there is an urgent need to react to the violence against trans people and to seek mechanisms to protect trans people. Some international trans activists even started to introduce the term ‘transcide’ to reflect the continuously elevated level of deadly violence against trans people on a global scale.

Cases have been reported from all major World Regions (Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, North America, and Oceania), evoking an evermore gruesome picture, especially given the very partial knowledge we are able to gain in many places. An interactive map showing most of the 816 reported murders of trans people is available at:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/tvt-project/tmm-results/all-tmm-reports-since-2008.htm

Most reported cases were from Central and South America, which amount to 643 cases in 21 countries and account for roughly 80 % of the globally reported murders of trans people since January 2008. In this region, there has been the strongest increase in reports (2008: 94, 2009: 165, 2010: 180, and 2011: 204). In Colombia, 59 killings have been reported in total, numbers steadily increasing since 2008 (2008: 13, 2009: 13, 2010: 15, 2011: 18). In Mexico, 60 cases have been reported in total, roughly doubling each year (2008: 4, 2009: 9, 2010: 14, 2011: 33). In Venezuela, there have been 48 reported killings in total, peaking in 2009 and 2011 (2008: 4, 2009: 22, 2010: 5, 2011: 17). In Brazil, the country with most reported killings (325 in total), there has been a steady increase (2008: 57, 2009: 68, 2010: 99, 2011: 101). Reports from countries with smaller population sizes are also extremely worrying, in particular the Dominican Republic (12 total), Guatemala (31) and Honduras (34). Killings of trans people in the region have also been reported from Argentina (18), Bolivia (7), Chile (3), Costa Rica (3), Cuba (1), Ecuador (9), El Salvador (7), Jamaica (1), Nicaragua (2), Panama (1), Paraguay (3), Peru (9), Puerto Rico (8), and Uruguay (2). 

The new result update moreover reveals that in the last 4 years, 59 killings of trans people have been reported in Asia (2008: 12, 2009: 14, 2010: 16, 2011: 17), 53 killings have been reported in North America (2008: 18, 2009: 13, 2010: 8, 2011: 14), 53 in Europe (2008: 13, 2009: 19, 2010: 9, 2011: 12), 4 in Oceania (2008: 3, 2009: 1) as well as 4 in Africa (2008: 1, 2009: 2. 2011: 1).

Regarding Asia, since January 2008 59 killings of trans people have been reported in 13 countries (Afghanistan: 1, Azerbaijan: 2, China: 6, India: 10, Indonesia: 4, Iran: 1, Iraq: 3, Malaysia: 6, Pakistan: 12, Philippines: 10, Republic of Korea: 1, Singapore: 1, and Thailand: 2).

In Europe, 53 killings of trans people have been reported in 11 countries (Albania: 1, France: 1, Germany: 2, Italy: 14, Poland: 1, Portugal: 1, Russia: 2, Serbia: 1, Spain: 4, Turkey: 23, and UK: 3). The data also show a continuously elevated number of reported murders in Turkey in the previous years (2008: 4, 2009: 7, 2010: 6, 2011: 6).

In Oceania, 4 killings have been reported since 2008 (Australia: 1, Fiji: 1, New Caledonia: 1, and New Zealand: 1) and in Africa also 4 (Algeria: 1, Mauritius: 1, Uganda: 1, and South Africa: 1).

Attached to this press release you can find a map, which demonstrates the absolute figures of reports found worldwide since January 2008.

While the documentation of killings of trans people is indispensable for demonstrating the shocking extent of human rights violations committed against trans people on a global scale, there is also a need for in-depth research of various other aspects related to the human rights situation of trans people. Therefore, Transgender Europe developed the Trans Murder Monitoring project into the‘Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide’ research project (TvT). TvT is a comparative, ongoing qualitative-quantitative research project, which provides an overview of the human rights situation of trans people in different parts of the world and develops useful data and advocacy tools for international institutions, human rights organizations, the trans movement and the general public. A research team from Transgender Europe is coordinating the project, which is funded by the Open Society Foundations, the ARCUS Foundation, and partly by the Heinrich Boell Foundation. The TvT research team is assisted by an Advisory Board composed of international LGBT, trans and human rights activists and academics from Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, North America, and Oceania. It furthermore cooperates with more than a dozen partner organizations in these six World Regions.

Since December 2011, the TvT project has been constantly updating a comprehensive and detailed Mapping of the Legal and Health Care Situation of trans people on a global scale, which can be found at:

http://www.transrespect-transphobia.org/en_US/mapping.htm

In November 2011, the TvT research team together with six partner organizations from Asia, Eastern Europe, Oceania, and South America started a new survey in form of a peer research on trans people’s experiences with Transrespect and Transphobia.

 

If you have further questions or if you want to support the research project, please contact the TvT research team:

Dr Carsten Balzer and Dr Jan Simon Hutta

research[at]transrespect-transphobia.org

or check our website:

www.transrespect-transphobia.org

 

If you want to support the “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” project, you can also contribute with a donation to Transgender Europe (details below).

Please enter “TvT project” as reference of the payment. Account Holder: Transgender Europe Bank: Nordostsee-Sparkasse Swift/BIC: NOLADE21NOS IBAN: DE 47 2175 0000 0163 4963 67 Reference of payment: TvT project