Today Apr-23-14

Announcements

November 2012: 265 killings of trans people in the last 12 months reveals TGEU’s Trans Murder Monitoring project  
 

March 2011: Alarming figures - Transgender Europe’s Trans Murder Monitoring project reveals more than 500 reported murders of trans people in the last 3 years

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July 2009: New Research Project: The Trans Murder Monitoring Project

In cooperation with "Liminalis - A Journal for Sex/Gender Emancipation and Resistance" TGEU is starting a monitoring and research project that focuses on murdered trans people worldwide.

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April 2009: New Journal: Transgender Studies Quarterly

A new interdisciplinary Journal on transgender called "Transgender Studies Quarterly" and edited by Paisley Currah and Susan Stryker will be published shortly.

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November 2008: New Study on Transgender of TGEU member published

The comparative study “Gender Outlaw Triptychon – An Ethnological Study on Self Images and forms of Self Organisation within the Transgender Subcultures of Rio de Janeiro, New York and Berlin” by the German anthropologist and TGEU research network member Carsten Balzer has been published in the Internet.

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October 2008: TGEU publishes Policy Paper on DSM revise

Being concerned about the new developments regarding the revise of the DSM IV by APA, TGEU publishes its “Policy Paper on DSM IV revise”.

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July 2008: Call for Papers: “Intersex and Transgender in Movement!”

The third issue of “Liminalis – A Journal for Sex/Gender Emancipation” will address the topic of “Intersex and Transgender in movement”. This issue will be the first one published tri-lingually, because we will incorporate Spanish as an additional language.

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July 2008: Second issue of “Liminalis” published

The second issue of the bi-lingual scientific Online-Journal “Liminalis – A Journal for Sex / Gender Emancipation” is published and can be viewed at www.liminalis.de.

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May 2008: TGEU Research Network founded!

During the “Movement in Academia”-Workshop at the 2nd European Transgender Council from May 1st to 4th 2008 in Berlin, the TGEU research network was founded.

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 April 2009: New Journal: Transgender Studies Quarterly

We (Paisley Currah and Susan Stryker) are writing because of your interest or involvement in the TransSomatechnics Conference held in Vancouver in May 2008.

We have been approached by a major academic publisher to create a new journal--the Transgender Studies Quarterly. We believe this can be an important next step in the development of trans studies as an interdisiplinary area of inquiry and are excited to move forward with the opportunity.

There is a lot of absolutely first rate trans scholarship being produced that sometimes has difficulty getting published in the traditional disciplines, or even interdiscplinary areas. We'd like to remedy that. Furthermore, we think that publishing trans related research in a flagship journal will give this scholarship the readership it deserves, making it easier for those new to the topic to find work being produced in the trans studies field, and providing an intellectual hub for those already working in the field.

The journal will be international in scope, and take "transgender" as a broad starting point for critical and social analysis--including critiques of the way "transgender" itself functions. We are planning on publishing four issues a year--two will be “general” issues and two issues will be themed special issues, edited by guest editors. We seek to recruit a large editorial board, to help emerging scholars and advanced grad students gain professional experience, that can form smaller working groups to assume primary responsibility for steering each issue into print. Our goal as general editors is to provide organizational support and editorial oversight, but to spread the intellectual rewards and pragmatic responsibilities for the journal as broadly as possible.

As we draft the proposal, we're reaching out to you for feedback, ideas, suggestions, cautions, and caveats.  Your responses to some or all of the questions below will help us shape the proposal, and ultimately the journal, into an exciting venue for research in transgender studies.  And if you have other comments, please feel free to add them.

NOTE: PLEASE REPLY TO [tsqjournal@gmail.com]

1. Would you be willing to serve on the editorial board or advisory board? If so, please forward to us your name, contact info, a short biographical profile, and your CV.

2. Do you have a "dream article" you'd like to write, or see written?

3. Do you have ideas for a themed special issue? What would your fantasy table of contents look like?

4. Do you have any opinions about what kinds of regular features would be useful or desirable, in addition to the standard scholarly research articles and book reviews (opinion pieces, conference reports, media/film/art reviews, activist alerts, archival treasures)?

5. Flagship journals of the type we propose are often the official publication of a professional organization. Is there any interest in using the launch of this journal to form a transgender studies association?

Thanks for taking the time to consider these requests!

Yours truly,

Paisley Currah                   Susan Stryker Associate Professor           Associate Professor Political Science                Gender Studies CUNY-Brooklyn                 Indiana University

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November 2008: New Study on Transgender of TGEU member published

The study is a Ph.D. thesis, that has been published in German and can be downloaded as a pdf-file at http://www.diss.fu-berlin.de/diss/receive/FUDISS_thesis_000000005722.

You find an English abstract below:

English Abstract

”Gender Outlaw Triptychon” is an ethnological study on transgender subcultures in Rio de Janeiro, New York City, and Berlin. In the study transgender serves as an umbrella term for individuals who do not, or only temporarily live according to the gender, they were assigned to at birth. In the places the research was undertaken these are mainly those people who define themselves as cross-dressers, drag kings, drag queens, transformistas, transgendered, transsexuals, transvestites, travestis and tunten.  The study focuses on the tension that arises from the relation between subculturally constructed self images and mainstream images of which the latter are shaped and passed on mainly by pathologising discourses in medicine, psychology and sexology. In addition the connection between marginalisation in the mainstream and self-organisation in urban subcultures is examined. The study is based on fieldwork conducted in Rio de Janeiro, New York City and Berlin from 2000 to 2002. The qualitative interviews with more than 110 informants and numerous informal conversations are supplemented by a detailed analysis of subcultural and mainstream media. The comprehensive intercultural, comparative ethnographical presentation of the research is accompanied by a detailed analysis and critical reflection of pathologising discourses and their genesis, drawing, among others upon some of Michel Foucault’s and Judith Butler’s assumptions as well as on an ethnological comparison of alternative constructions of sex and gender in foreign cultures, mainly from Native North America, Asia and Oceania. Thus, the study demonstrates on different levels that pathologising discourses and mainstream images, particularly of so-called syndromes such as “transsexuality” and “transvestism” are based on a unquestioned cultural matrix called heteronormativity. Within this matrix transgender people can only be perceived as “deviant” from an essentialist, naturalised binary gender system. The main thesis of the study is that the majority of the subculturally evolved self images cannot be described in fixed and monotonous categories. Instead they are very flexible, variable and partly contradicting elements of a diverse spectrum, in which sex and gender can be viewed as fluid and changeable categories. Against this background different factors that influence the formation of transgender identities are explored and named. These factors are the self-organisation in subcultures and within a new social movement, including its emic discourses, different historical circumstances, the local cultural settings and certain forms of “cultural globalisation”. Based on the rich ethnographic material and the intercultural comparison as well as by using a sociohistorical focus and ethnological theories, the proclaimed universality of pathologising discourses and the research on aetiology as a result are fundamentally questioned. Furthermore, abstract theories of gender studies, such as, Butler’s model of performativity are critically reflected upon and followed by a presentation of an independent, ethnographically based thesis. Thus, transgender subcultures are viewed as an anti-structure to the normative order in which liminality instead of compulsion makes the constitutive moment of performativity. In this sense the study constitutes an important contribution to Transgender Studies and Transgender Theory.

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October 2008: TGEU publishes Policy Paper on DSM revise

Being concerned about the new developments regarding the reformation of the DSM IV by APA, TGEU publishes its “Policy Paper on DSM IV revise”:

The Steering Committee of Transgender Europe (TGEU) lends its support to the joint statement of May 28, 2008 issued by the US-American organizations National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), the Transgender Law and Policy Institute (TLPI), the Transgender Law Center (TLC) and the Transgender Youth Family Allies (TYFA). After meeting with the American Psychological Association (APA), these four groups reported that "[they] are confident that a fair, unbiased review of current knowledge can result in a DSM-V that can move society toward a more rational and humane understanding of transgender people." DSM is the “Diagnostic and Statistic Manual” published by the APA. The review process will go on for several years, and the APA welcomes suggestions from lay persons as well as mental health professionals in this process.

Transgender Europe expressed in its press release after the 2nd European Transgender Council in Berlin:

“Despite much scientific controversy, forms of transgender continue to be listed in the DSM IV of the APA, just as homosexuality once was, and in the ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases) of the World Health Organization (WHO) as psychological disorders. DSM and ICD are guideline manuals used in healthcare to standardise the definitions of what constitutes mental illness. Transgender Europe emphatically refuses this pathologisation and will assist the next reformulation of the DSM in a critical manner.”

We, the Steering Committee, are firmly of the conviction that the stigmatization, which in part is grounded in the mistaken assumption that gender variance is /prima facie /a medical disorder, is discriminatory. Furthermore, we cite the Yogyakarta Principles, Article 18:

“No person may be forced to undergo any form of medical or psychological treatment, procedure, testing or be confined to a medical facility, based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Notwithstanding any classifications to the contrary, a person's sexual orientation and gender identity are not, in and of themselves, medical conditions and are not to be treated, cured or suppressed.”

A number of national governments and international bodies have passed resolutions in support of these principles: the European Parliament (EP), the Council of Europe (CoE), the Organization of American States (OAS).

Any revision of the DSM and the ICD must be carried out with full compliance to the Yogyakarta Principles.

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July 2008: Call for Papers: “Intersex and Transgender in Movement!”

The third issue of “Liminalis – A Journal for Sex/Gender Emancipation” will address the topic of “Intersex and Transgender in movement”. This issue will be the first one published tri-lingually, because we will incorporate Spanish as an additional language. The call for papers in English, German and Spanish can be found below:

English Version       German Version     Spanish Version

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Liminalis 2009 – Call for Papers

Intersex and Transgender in Movement!

In the early 1990s two New Social Movements arose in the USA. These movements rapidly became international movements under the umbrella names “transgender” and “intersex”. Both movements have similar starting points: the diverse forms of societal discrimination on the basis of the pathologization and normalization of bodies, identities and performativities. In academic literature they are subsumed under the term “New Gender Movements”. However, this term obscures the activists’ different experiences, strategies and goals and the inherent conflicts and misunderstandings between as well as within the two movements. Potentially shared goals such as the critique of a heternormative society are often portrayed undifferentiatedly, the politics of the movements hereby become limited to minority politics and their vigor is undermined.  Since its foundation Liminalis, a “journal for sex/gender emancipation”, tries to focus attention on both social movements and their specific and diverse topics. In doing so, a non-pathologizing and non-exotisizing engagement, which pays justice to the aims of these emancipatory social movements is aspired. For the third edition we invite papers that discuss the birth of transgender and intersex movements, their development, strategies, methods and goals in a differentiated and balanced way but also their differences and similarities, their conflicts and collaboration. Contributions that reveal the diversity of these movements in terms of different identities and social, political and cultural contexts are very welcome.

Deadline for abstracts: August 30, 2008. Deadline for papers: November 30, 2008.

wissenschaft[@]tgnb.de www.liminalis.de

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Liminalis 2009 – Call for Papers

Intersex und Transgender in Bewegung!

In den frühen 1990ern formierten sich in den USA zwei Neue Soziale Bewegungen, die unter den namensgebenden Oberbegriffen “Transgender” und “Intersex” innerhalb kurzer Zeit zu internationalen Bewegungen wurden. Beide Bewegungen besitzen ähnliche Ausgangsvoraussetzungen: die diversen Formen gesellschaftlicher Diskriminierung aufgrund einer Pathologisierung und Normierung von Körpern, Identitäten und Performativitäten. In der wissenschaftlichen Literatur werden sie daher auch unter dem Begriff “New Gender Movements” subsumiert. Dies verdeckt jedoch die unterschiedlichen Erfahrungen, Strategien und Ziele der Aktivist_innen sowie die darin wurzelnden Konflikte und Missverständnisse zwischen den sowie auch innerhalb der beiden Bewegungen. Ebenso werden mögliche gemeinsame Ziele wie die Kritik an einer heteronormativen Gesellschaft oft verwaschen dargestellt, die Politiken der Bewegungen zu “Minderheitenpolitiken” geschmälert und damit ihre Schlagkraft untergraben. Als “Zeitschrift für geschlechtliche Emanzipation” hat die Liminalis seit ihrer Gründung beide soziale Bewegungen und ihre spezifischen und unterschiedlichen Thematiken im Blick. Dabei streben wir eine nicht-pathologisierende und nicht-exotisierende Weise der Auseinandersetzung an, die den Anliegen dieser emanzipatorischen sozialen Bewegungen Rechnung trägt. In der dritten Ausgabe sollen nun die Entstehung der Transgender- und Intersex-Bewegungen, ihre Entwicklungen, Strategien, Methoden und Ziele in differenzierter und ausgewogener Art behandelt sowie ihre Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten, ihre Konflikte und Kooperationen ausgelotet werden. Beiträge, die die Diversität dieser Bewegungen bezüglich der Identitäten und der sozialen, politischen und kulturellen Kontexte aufzeigen, sind besonders erwünscht.

Einsendeschluss für Abstracts ist der 30. August 2008. Einsendeschluss für fertige Artikel ist der 30. November 2008.

wissenschaft[@]tgnb.de www.liminalis.de

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Liminalis 2009 – convocatoria de contribución

¡Intersex y trans en movimiento!

A principios de los años 90 se crearon en Estados Unidos dos nuevos movimientos sociales que se convirtieron rápidamente en movimientos internacionales bajo los términos generales de “transgender” (transgénero) e “intersex”. Ambos movimientos poseen características de partida parecidas: las diversas formas de discriminación social debida a una patologización y normativización de cuerpos, identidades y performatividades. Por esta razón, en la bibliografía científica se les engloba bajo el concepto de “New Gender Movements” (“Nuevos Movimientos de Género”). Sin embargo, este hecho encubre las experiencias, las estrategias y los objetivos diferenciados de l*s activistas, así como los conflictos y malentendidos resultantes tanto entre como dentro de ambos movimientos. Asimismo, potenciales objetivos compartidos, como la crítica a una sociedad heteronormativa, a menudo se representan de forma desdibujada, las políticas de los movimientos se reducen a una “política de minorías”, desactivándose, de esta forma, su fuerza de acción. Como “Revista para la Emancipación de los Sexos/Géneros”, Liminalis ha dirigido, desde sus inicios, la mirada a ambos movimientos sociales y sus temáticas específicas y diferenciales. Buscamos una forma de discusión no-patologizante y no-exotizante que tenga en cuenta los propósitos de estos movimientos sociales emancipatorios. En la tercera edición, se pretende tratar, de forma diferenciada y equilibrada, el surgimiento de los movimientos trans e intersex, su desarrollo, estrategias, métodos y objetivos, así como sondear sus diferencias y puntos compartidos, sus conflictos y formas de cooperación. Se invita especialmente a presentar contribuciones que muestren la diversidad de estos movimientos respecto a identidades y contextos sociales, políticos y culturales.

Fecha límite para los resúmenes: 30 de agosto de 2008. Fecha límite para los artículos completos: 30 de noviembre de 2008.

wissenschaft[@]tgnb.de www.liminalis.de

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July 2008: Second issue of “Liminalis” published

The second issue of the bi-lingual scientific Online-Journal “Liminalis – a Journal for Sex / Gender Emancipation” is published and can be viewed at www.liminalis.de. The subject of the second issue is „Pathologization and Emancipation“. The new issue includes academic, essayistic and artistic presentations of views on the discussion about possible ways of emancipation and resistance. The contributions present possible legal, linguistic, and artistic ways to deconstruct and change the heteronormative bi-gendered/sexed organization of society.

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© TGEU 2009, TGEU - transgender europe